Sumatra Toba Batak Peaberry SWP Decaf

The cup is earthy-sweet up front, and with a flavor of Chai spice. Pungent fruits like papaya and jack fruit start to show up in the cool cup. This coffee finishes with lots of chocolate, especially in darker roasts, which verge on raw cacao nibs. If you put this out next to it's non-decaf counterpart you'd likely guess it's decaf, but on it's own, it shines, highlighting much of the classic Indo cup characteristics. City+ to Full City+.
Out of stock
86.2
  • Process Method Wet Process
  • Cultivar Typica Types
  • Farm Gate Yes
Region Indonesia & SE Asia
Processing Wet Process, then SWP Decaf
Drying Method Sun- and Machine-dried
Arrival date Nov 5 2013
Lot size 38bags/boxes
Bag size 60.00kg
Packaging GrainPro liner
Farm Gate Yes
Cultivar Detail Ateng, Djember
Grade 1
Appearance .0 d/300gr, 16+ PB screen
Roast Recommendations City+ to Full City+ roast is recommended here.
Weight 1
We're happy to have another Indonesia decaf that is from our own personal stock. We've been so pleased with this particular peaberry lot from Lintong, Sumatra, that we decided it would make a great addition to our custom Swiss Water decafs we're having processed. And a great addition it is. Lintong Nihota is the town that has become synonymous with the entire southern part of Lake Toba area. Lake Toba defines the landscape of the area, the largest volcanic crater lake in the world, and the result of the largest volcanic event on earth in the last 25 million years! It is huge, and the coffees from the north and eastern shores are quite different from the Lintong coffees. Lintong coffees are farmed by the Batak peoples that are the indigenous tribe that works the coffee in this area. The family of collectors we source this lot from works direct with the small growers, bypassing the local markets in most cases, where lower grade coffees are mixed in with the better lots. Decafs have come a long way, but even still, most of what you see commercially are those dark brown (yes, when raw), chemically processed, stale flavored decaf coffees. But not this one - it's retained much of the 'trademark' Indo cup characteristics, including the rustic sweetness, even as a decaf. It's amazing how far decaf coffees have come. Should you be punished for drinking decaf? We think not.
Grinding the coffee, I get a whiff of brown rice syrup, rustic and sweet, along with a green herb-like tarragon smell - just what I'd expect from good Sumatran coffee. Dark roasts are sweet and have a bit of honey-wheat bread, which is not a bad thing, but reminds us it's a decaf. Hot water really boosts the overall sweetness as well as the herbal quality. Light roasts are particularly earthy and have a baked pumpkin and brown sugar smell. It's definitely Indo and the wafts of aromatic wood come up in the steam when breaking the crust. The cup is earthy-sweet up front, and with a flavor of Chai spice. Pungent fruits like papaya and jack fruit start to show up in the cool cup. This coffee finishes with lots of chocolate, especially in darker roasts, which verge on raw cacao nibs. If you put this out next to it's non-decaf counterpart you'd likely guess it's decaf, but on it's own, it shines, highlighting much of the classic Indo cup characteristics. We continue to be impressed by the folks at Swiss Water, continually proving that decaffeinated coffees can taste like the origing from which they originate.