Sumatra Abyssinia Typica Micro-Lot

The unique quality of this coffee is the slightly floral, sweetly-fruited flavors that come through. There is darkly intense chocolate flavors in the cup, even in the lighter roast levels, finishing in a pleasantly bittering and slightly earthy chocolate tang. The cup is so creamy, and the body possesses great viscosity. We really found sweeter and more full-body cups from this coffee after 2+ days of rest, after roasting. I see this a lot with Sumatras, more balance, more body after the coffee can stabilize post-roast. City to City+.
Out of stock
87.2
  • Process Method Giling Basah
  • Cultivar Heirloom Types
  • Farm Gate Yes
Region Indonesia & SE Asia
Processing Wet Hulled (Giling Basah)
Drying Method Patio Sun-dried
Arrival date Feb 22 2013
Lot size 9bags/boxes
Bag size 60.00kg
Packaging Jute Bag
Farm Gate Yes
Cultivar Detail Abyssinia
Grade 1
Appearance 1 d/300gr, 17-18 Screen
Roast Recommendations This is a unique Sumatra in some ways, and a more typical, classic one in others. Lighter roasts will accentuate what is distinct about this coffee. We recommend City to City+ for this reason.
Weight 1 LB
This is an unusual micro-lot of Sumatra coffee. When traveling in the northern Gayo area we had noticed there were old Typica type trees still located in some pockets, but that these old types were excessively rare. Much of the coffee is catimor-type varieties that have both arabica and robusta genes. In the more populated areas, these old Typica type cultivars were destroyed by plant disease, and were replaced long ago. These old plants were sometimes referred to as Bergendahl, which is known as an old Dutch cultivar that would have come from Yemen via India, landing on the nearby island of Java where the Dutch colony of Batavia (Jakarta) was located. From there it would have been spread to other areas of coffee production in the Dutch colonies. Bergendahl, we figured out on that trip, might be a rough translation of "Hill and Valley" referring to the rolling landscape of coffee farms. This lot is from a later introduction of a Typica coffee, Abyssinia type, that was brought to Java around 1928 and found its way to parts of Indonesia like Aceh. But it is the same old plant material of the original Typica that came from Ethiopia (Abyssinia) in the distant past. This is a wet-hulled coffee, so a good portion of the cup character comes from processing, but, particularily with lighter roasts, unique flavors on the Abyssinia Typica cultivar come through.
This coffee has a sweet dry fragrance, with loads of banana esters, some hints of honeydew melon, and rue herbal notes. The wet aroma is very sweet, with chocolate fudge and banana cream notes and some hints of clean fresh earth. The cup has a densely weighted mouthfeel, and strong rustic sweetness. The unique quality of this coffee is the slightly floral, sweetly-fruited flavors that come through. There is darkly intense chocolate flavors in the cup, even in the lighter roast levels, finishing in a pleasantly bittering and slightly earthy chocolate tang. The cup is so creamy, and the body possesses great viscosity. We really found sweeter and more full-body cups from this coffee after 2+ days of rest, after roasting. I see this a lot with Sumatras, more balance, more body after the coffee can stabilize post-roast.