Colombia Tolima Florestales -Maximinio Gutierrez April 2010

This lot is a family effort, as small-farm coffees so often are; Maximinio Gutierrez and the adjacent farms of his brothers and sons. They call it Finca Las Florestales, and it has already been recognized with a #11 spot in a recent Cup of Excellence competition. The cup has tons of sweet berry (City roast level), strawberry jam initially, with a more blended berry as the cup cools (raspberry-strawberry mixed). The apple pie/apple pastry taste emerges as well, with a detectable cinnamon accent. It's a very refined cup, and I would say the brightness, the acidity is especially graceful and succinct. It also has the cumulative effect of being remarkably juicy, no doubt an effect of the berry notes and the sweetness. City to City+ roast.
Out of stock
90.4
  • Process Method No
  • Farm Gate Yes
Region South America
Farm Gate Yes
Grade Estate Grade
Appearance .0 d/300gr, 16-18 Screen
Roast Recommendations City to City+ is ideal ... this is a light roast coffee, so as to not bury the brightness and berry notes.
Weight 1 LB
This lot is a family effort, as small-farm coffees so often are; Maximinio Gutierrez and the adjacent farms of his brothers and sons. They call it Finca Las Florestales, and it has already been recognized with a #11 spot in a recent Cup of Excellence competition. The family grows 100% Caturra cultivar at the end of this remote valley, at altitudes between 1600 - 1800 meters. It's consistently been a standout coffee from the Herrera area, and this has to do with the careful drying of the parchment on the roof of their home, called a Casa Elba. Yes, as in Yemen, they created a flat roof "raised bed" for coffee drying. (It also protects the coffee from theives and FARC guerillas, because unfortunately the Herrera area is still fairly unstable. Even though I am going to Colombia next week, I can't visit this microregion. Maximinio's total production is about 20 bags of coffee. They use a pulper machine and then finish the coffee with overnight wet-fermentation, and then a rinse in pure water, traditional small-farm Colombia processing. The key is perhaps the careful drying I mentioned before, and the coffee is stored overnight in their house. The location is so remote that getting the coffee out of the valley can be an ordeal. The road was washed out for part of the coffee harvest time, and traverses a steep cliff (where more than a few trucks have gone over the edge with their coffee loads!) After we bought Florestales several years ago, I asked for help to track down Sr. Gutierrez to see if we could work on a longer term basis. With the help of Alejandro in Bogota we were finally successful and this very, very small lot is the first lot from that effort (we have another slightly larger microlot coming later). The dry fragrance is stunning, especially in the lighter roasts; candied peach and apple pie scents, very sweet, fruited, and floral. The wet aroma has violets, blackberry, and baked apple sweetness. The cup has tons of sweet berry (City roast level), strawberry jam initially, with a more blended berry as the cup cools (raspberry-strawberry mixed). The apple pie/apple pastry taste emerges as well, with a detectable cinnamon accent. It's a very refined cup, and I would say the brightness, the acidity is especially graceful and succinct. It also has the cumulative effect of being remarkably juicy, no doubt an effect of the berry notes and the sweetness.